gameofthronesdaily:

Oathkeeper; Even the sound of it is sharper than an ordinary sword. Valyrian steel, spell-forged. It was a sword fit for a hero.


hipslie:

If we learned anything from the Mayans, it’s that if you don’t finish something, it’s not the end of the world.


sansalayned:

The gods made the earth for all men t’ share. Only when the kings come with their crowns and steel swords, they claimed it was all theirs. “My trees,” they said, “you can’t eat them apples. My stream, you can’t fish here. My wood, you’re not t’ hunt. My earth, my water, my castle, my daughter, keep your hands away or I’ll chop ‘em off, but maybe if you kneel t’ me I’ll let you have a sniff.” You call us thieves, but at least a thief has t’ be brave and clever and quick. A kneeler only has t’ kneel.

Ygritte appreciation week » Day 6: Favorite quote


posted 2 hours ago

The Night’s Watch is a military order dedicated to holding the Wall, the immense fortification on the northern border of the Seven Kingdoms, defending the realms of men from what lies beyond the Wall. The order’s foundation dates back to the Age of Heroes, at the time when the Others were pushed back. The men of Night’s Watch wear only black.


"You are a dream; I hope I never meet you."
— Sylvia Plath, The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath

asshaiishadowbinder:

Somewhere George RR Martin is snapping in Z formation.


soullesshusk:

strangersatthemall:

negacrow:

nightmareloki:

newvagabond:

Omfg.

OH MY GOD

Well, that was unexpected.

whAT EVEN IS GOING ON>??

ok I’ve seen this like 8 times on my dash and ignored it but now I finally watched it because I was like “okay this has to be SOMETHING good because everyone I fucking follow is reblogging it”

I was not fucking let down at all.


  • Q: A major concern in A Song of Ice and Fire and Game of Thrones is power. Almost everybody – except maybe Daenerys, across the waters with her dragons – wields power badly.
  • George R.R. Martin: Ruling is hard. This was maybe my answer to Tolkien, whom, as much as I admire him, I do quibble with. Lord of the Rings had a very medieval philosophy: that if the king was a good man, the land would prosper. We look at real history and it's not that simple. Tolkien can say that Aragorn became king and reigned for a hundred years, and he was wise and good. But Tolkien doesn't ask the question: What was Aragorn's tax policy? Did he maintain a standing army? What did he do in times of flood and famine? And what about all these orcs? By the end of the war, Sauron is gone but all of the orcs aren't gone – they're in the mountains. Did Aragorn pursue a policy of systematic genocide and kill them? Even the little baby orcs, in their little orc cradles? In real life, real-life kings had real-life problems to deal with. Just being a good guy was not the answer. You had to make hard, hard decisions. Sometimes what seemed to be a good decision turned around and bit you in the ass; it was the law of unintended consequences. I've tried to get at some of these in my books. My people who are trying to rule don't have an easy time of it. Just having good intentions doesn't make you a wise king.

posted 11 hours ago